Kids’ Pop Playlist


Every month we have Art Waves on Cape Breton University’s Caper Radio. This radio show aims connect you with the staff here at the CBUAG as well as the artists featured in the gallery through the connection between music and art. We also want to get to know our student artists as well, which is why we also have our Student Playlists. Using our newly made YouTube channel, we will be able to bring you more playlists with a wider selections of songs to choose from! This music is specifically chosen by the week’s featured student and says something about how they work both outside and in the visual arts.

This summer the CBUAG was happy to host four exciting art camps for kids! Today, our playlist is populated with the songs these young artists were listening to while they created. Some of these were even requested by the kids themselves. What songs inspire children to create? Click below to listen.

To submit a suggestion for next weeks playlist or your own playlist , email your name, the link to your playlist and a short description of its significance to cbuag_collections@hotmail.com or leave it in the comment section below!

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🌈 PRIDE Colour Facts: Purple

pride colour facts

July is Pride Month and today marks the beginning of Sydney Pride. As strong allies, the CBUAG launched a brand new column here on our blog where, for the past 6 weeks, we brought you fun facts about each colour in the pride rainbow! These facts could be anything from their symbolism to their origin in paint production. Click here to learn all about the colours: RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PURPLE. This is our final week and we are going to look at Purple and its place in history.

Here are 7 interesting facts about the first colour of the Pride Rainbow, PURPLE.

1. How We See It

While violet is often thought of as a type of PURPLE, and is sometimes thought to be interchangeable, if we look at the light spectrum, that actually isn’t the case. PURPLE isn’t actually a colour in light, it is merely the mixture of two wavelengths (red and blue). The only “purple” that is on the spectrum is violet. The human eye can actually detect many colours that don’t have their own wavelengths. All the colours that we consider PURPLE exist along the “line of purple” that lies between red (630-740) and violet (380-420 nm). This means that pink is actually in the PURPLE family and not the red family like many think. Also, indigo is actually part of the violet family.

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Pride Playlist

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Every month we have Art Waves on Cape Breton University’s Caper Radio. This radio show aims connect you with the staff here at the CBUAG as well as the artists featured in the gallery through the connection between music and art. We also want to get to know our student artists as well, which is why we also have our Student Playlists. Using our newly made YouTube channel, we will be able to bring you more playlists with a wider selections of songs to choose from! This music is specifically chosen by the week’s featured student and says something about how they work both outside and in the visual arts.

This Weekend, the CBRM is celebrating Pride so this week’s playlist is full of some of the best LGBTQ+ songs about or by members of the community and celebrating who you are.

Click below to listen

Click below to listen to last year’s Pride playlist:

To submit a suggestion for next weeks playlist or your own playlist , email your name, the link to your playlist and a short description of its significance to cbuag_collections@hotmail.com or leave it in the comment section below!

DIY Newsprint Basket

DIY BannerEvery Saturday we feature a new and exciting DIY project that you can do at home, with things you probably already have, to make your house a little more efficient and a little more creative. These next few weeks, the CBUAG is hosting a variety of art camps for children and teens. One of the activities that we are doing at these camps is basket weaving. If you would also like to learn how to make these baskets but can’t attend one of the camps click below!

This weeks DIY Project is how to make your own Newsprint Basket:

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If you decide to make this DIY, be sure to send us a picture or comment below!

🌈 PRIDE Colour Facts: BLUE

pride colour facts

July is Pride Month and as strong allies, the CBUAG is launching a brand new column here on our blog where, for the next 6 weeks, we will be bringing you fun facts about each colour in the pride rainbow! These facts can be anything from their symbolism to their origin in paint production. Stay tuned to learn all about the colours: RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PURPLE. This week we are going to look at BLUE and its place in history.

Here are 7 interesting facts about the first colour of the Pride Rainbow, BLUE.

1. Expressions and Symbolism

In English, saying someone looks like a colour can have a lot of meaning. Green can be envious or sick, red can be enraged, and BLUE means sad or down. BLUE means very different things across the world, however. In Germany if you say someone looks BLUE, you’re saying that they are drunk. “This derives from the ancient use of urine (which is produced copiously by the human body after drinking alcohol) in dyeing cloth blue with woad or indigo.”

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🌈 PRIDE Colour Facts: GREEN

pride colour facts

July is Pride Month and as strong allies, the CBUAG is launching a brand new column here on our blog where, for the next 6 weeks, we will be bringing you fun facts about each colour in the pride rainbow! These facts can be anything from their symbolism to their origin in paint production. Stay tuned to learn all about the colours: RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PURPLE. This week we are going to look at GREEN and its place in history.

Here are 7 interesting facts about the first colour of the Pride Rainbow, GREEN.

1. The Name

GREEN, the colour of  vegetation, growth, and nature, is derived from the Old English word “growan” which means “to grow.” It can also be traced back to the Old Frisian  word “grēne” which meansfresh.” In many cultures around the world green is the symbol of growth and vitality so it is no surprise that it was named after it.

Like many things, GREEN symbolizes two things that are opposites. In some sense is can mean that something is expired or rotten,

1994   D. Nixon Hero of Beecher Island (1997) iv. 85   “When the men went to cut some flesh from the dead horses, they found that the meat was green and filled with maggots.”

However, it also represents a freshness. GREEN, in people, symbolizes a youngness, a naivety even. In other things it can mean something full of vitality, something not weathered or worn by time.

1583   P. Stubbes Anat. Abuses sig. Hviv,   “The remembrance wherof is yet green in their he[a]ds.”

In a way GREEN is like an old growth forest. The balance between decay and life.

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Upcoming Events: Film Screenings

SUMMER EXHIBITION FILM SERIES
Documentaries about Photography
July 28 – September 8, 2016

Screening 1: Thursday 28th July, 1pm

Film Poster for Chevolution, 2008

Film Poster for Chevolution, 2008

Chevolution (86minutes, 2009, Directed by Louis Lopez and Trisha Ziff) 
In 1960 the Cuban photographer known as Korda took a snapshot of Che Guevara whilst he was attending a memorial service in Havana. This photograph went on to become the most reproduced image in the history of the medium. This documentary asks: how and why did this photo become so important? The film is a fascinating study of how it entered the public domain to be exploited the world over. The film throws a revealing light on communism and capitalism, idealism and opportunism, art and commerce, and how they have interacted and operated on the same materials during the past half century.

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Film Poster for Bill Cunningham New York, 2010

Screening 2: Thursday 11th August, 7pm

Bill Cunningham New York (84minutes, 2010, Directed by Richard Press)
The “Bill” in question is 80+ New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham. For decades, this cultural anthropologist has been obsessively and inventively chronicling fashion trends and high society charity soirées for the Times Style section. Cunningham’s enormous body of work is more reliable than any catwalk as an expression of time, place and individual flair. In turn, Bill Cunningham New York is a delicate, funny and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.

Screening 3: Thursday 25th August, 1pm 

Film Poster for Finding Vivian Maier, 2013

Film Poster for Finding Vivian Maier, 2013

Finding Vivian Maier (83 minutes, 2013, Directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel)
This critically acclaimed documentary is about a mysterious nanny, who secretly took over 100,000 photographs and hid them in storage lockers. Decades later the photographs were discovered by chance at a house auction. Maier’s strange and riveting life and art are revealed through never before seen photographs, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her. Though her work is now regarded as being the finest within street photography she remains an elusive and enigmatic figure.

Screening 4: Thursday 8th September, 7pm

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Chihuahua, New York City, 1946. © Elliot Erwitt / Magnum Photos

Contacts (10 minutes)
The greatest photographers in the world reveal the secrets behind their images in this collection of short, personal films. Using images (contact prints, proofs, prints, or slides) with commentary by the artists, the program utilizes an original perspective to uncover the artistic processes of the greatest contemporary photographers.

Mugshot  (51minutes, 2014, Directed by Dennis Mohr)
Originally a law enforcement tool, the mugshot has deviated from its fundamental purpose as a source of criminal identification. “Mugshot” explores the personal stories of those whose lives have been transformed by these iconic photographs, and examines their cultural significance and value to contemporary society.

William Stanley Moore, Photograph by The Sydney Justice & Police Museum, c.1920

William Stanley Moore, Photograph by The Sydney Justice & Police Museum, c.1920

🌈 PRIDE Colour Facts: YELLOW

pride colour facts

July is Pride Month and as strong allies, the CBUAG is launching a brand new column here on our blog where, for the next 6 weeks, we will be bringing you fun facts about each colour in the pride rainbow! These facts can be anything from their symbolism to their origin in paint production. Stay tuned to learn all about the colours: RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PURPLE. This week we are going to look at YELLOW and its place in history.

Here are 7 interesting facts about the first colour of the Pride Rainbow, YELLOW.

1. Popularity

Based on various surveys across the world, 40% of people say that blue is their favourite colour while YELLOW is among one of the most disliked colours.

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🌈 PRIDE Colour Facts: ORANGE

pride colour facts

July is Pride Month and as strong allies, the CBUAG is launching a brand new column here on our blog where, for the next 6 weeks, we will be bringing you fun facts about each colour in the pride rainbow! These facts can be anything from their symbolism to their origin in paint production. Stay tuned to learn all about the colours: RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PURPLE. This week we are going to look at ORANGE and its place in history.

Here are 7 interesting facts about the first colour of the Pride Rainbow, ORANGE.

1. The Name

The color we know as orange was referred to in Old English as “geoluhread,” which means yellow-red. It is easy to think that the popular fruit, ORANGE, would have gotten its name because of its vibrant colour. However, this is the one instance (in the traditional rainbow spectrum) where the colour actually gained its name from the object. The color we know as orange was referred to in Old English as “geoluhread,” which means yellow-red. The word “ORANGE” was adopted after the eponymous fruit was introduced to English via the Spanish word naranja. That’s right, the fruit came before the colour!

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Artist Talk

D’ARCY WILSON | ARTIST TALK
Wednesday July 6, 2016 | 6-7pm
James McConnell Memorial Library
50 Falmouth St, Sydney

DArcy Wilson - Work in Progress

For the first half of July, Halifax-based artist D’Arcy Wilson is artist-in-residence at CBU Art Gallery, where she will be creating new work to exhibit in the upcoming fall exhibition, Shaping the Shore: From Here and Away which will feature artworks by historical and contemporary women artists with a focus on cultural production in Cape Breton. For this talk, Ms. Wilson will discuss her current artistic practice and work in progress.

D’Arcy Wilson is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily with performance. She received an MFA from the University of Calgary (’08), and a BFA from Mount Allison University (’05). D’Arcy has exhibited her work across Canada in solo and group exhibitions, and has participated in various artist residencies. She sits on the board of directors at Eyelevel Gallery and she is also an art educator. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Visual Arts Department at Memorial University, Grenfell Campus (Cornerbrook, NL).

The talk is free and open to the public. This program is generously supported by Arts Nova Scotia.